28/4/2021

Practitioner survey on management for curlew

Screenshot 2021-03-31 121345

The Curlew Recovery Partnership is a new, exciting and transformative initiative, bringing together all those with an interest in curlew conservation, including land managers, farmers, gamekeepers, policymakers and researchers. We are joining forces to help secure the future of one of England’s most iconic and threatened species, the Eurasian curlew.

CRP_PR_image 1(credit _Tom _Streeter)

Urgent action is needed. The curlew is arguably the most pressing bird conservation priority in the UK, where nearly half the breeding population has been lost over the last 25 years and where range contraction has seen curlews disappear from many traditional sites.

While we broadly understand the main causes of curlew declines, we know that accommodating the needs of curlews in today’s landscapes is not straightforward. To implement effective action to recover curlew populations, we need to better understand from people working on the ground what are the main obstacles hindering management for curlews and which elements of agri-environment schemes or policy support are inadequate.

Please help us work towards better advice and support mechanisms for curlew by sharing your experience through our survey.

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Comments

Ground nesting birds

at 8:35 on 04/05/2021 by Terry Fricker

I heartily agree with Nick van zwanenberg's comments regarding the predation pressure which is compounded by the plethera of protectionist legislation making predator control progressively more difficult. We attempt to control predators across a large area adjacent to the Chilterns where the most common birds in the air are Red Kites, Buzzards and Corvids, Foxes and Badgers patrol suitable ground bird nesting areas at night. The Gamekeepers Organisation won the legal battle for licenses to be issued to cull Kites and Buzzards but Defra ensures they are difficult and slow to obtain and, similarly, Defra will not extend the Designate Badger Cull Area albeit we are overrun with big numbers of Badgers. The recent moves to "re-wild" Wolves, Wild Cats, Beavers and Lynx in this country show again how the "re-wilding" fraternity do not seem capable of considering the long term damaging effects of their plans.

Curlew spotting

at 8:31 on 30/04/2021 by Ian Preddy

I've seen curlews many time (heard them more often) whilst travelling over Woodhead and moorland north of there but was surprised to see one flying over fields between Cawthorne and Barnsley. Since then they've been mentioned in the TV programme featuring Cannon Hall farm.

Ground nesting bird recovery projects

at 9:27 on 29/04/2021 by Nick van zwanenberg

In my view these projects will ultimately fail unless the pressures from predation from all sources is reduced. That means both 4 legged and avian. The problem that land mangers currently face, is that the legislation that we have has come about because of what I'll call knee jerk reactions to events. The 1st was the problems created by Dialdrin in the 1950's and 60's which led to the virtual extinction of birds of prey. This meant the deification of these birds which led to the current rules. Then came the problerms of badger baiting which led to the absurd rules we currently face in not being allowed to control these mustelids. Illegal Hare coursing led to more knee jerk legislation. The current trapping rules are of couse not sustainable either. It is getting close to impossible to control rabbits with most of the tools have been made illegal. It is likely that we'll get the police watching over spider's webs next. For any ground nesting bird project to be successful, envirnomentalists need lots of lots of tools available in their armoury. They then need sensible legislation that gives clear and flexible guidance so that they can be used responsibly and within a framework that encourages their proper use that is for the overall benefit for our countrysider and not solely for the prevention of wrongdoing that effectively makes criminals of all of us.

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