Effect of weather conditions on the spring migration of Eurasian Woodcock and consequences for breeding

Author Le Rest, K., Hoodless, A., Heward C., Cazemave. J.-L., & Ferrand, Y.
Citation Le Rest, K., Hoodless, A., Heward C., Cazemave. J.-L., & Ferrand, Y. (2019). Effect of weather conditions on the spring migration of Eurasian Woodcock and consequences for breeding. Ibis 161: 559-572.

Abstract

Migration is a critical period of time with fitness consequences for birds. The development of tracking technologies now allows researchers to examine how different aspects of bird migration affect population dynamics. Weather conditions experienced during migration are expected to influence movements and, subsequently, the timing of arrival and the energetic costs involved. We analysed satellite-tracking data from 68 Eurasian Woodcock Scolopax rusticola fitted with Argos satellite tags in the British Isles and France (2012–17). First, we evaluated the effect of weather conditions (temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, atmospheric stability and visibility) on migration movements of individuals. Then we investigated the consequences for breeding success (age ratio) and brood precocity (early-brood ratio) population-level indices while accounting for climatic variables on the breeding grounds. Air temperature, wind and relative humidity were the main variables related to migration movements, with high temperatures and northward winds greatly increasing the probability of onward flights, whereas a trend towards greater humidity over 4 days decreased the probability of movement. Breeding success was mostly affected by climatic variables on the breeding grounds. The proportion of juveniles in autumn was negatively correlated with temperature in May, but positively correlated with precipitation in June and July. Brood precocity was poorly explained by the covariates used in this study. Our data for the Eurasian Woodcock indicate that, although weather conditions during spring migration affect migration movements, they do not have a major influence on subsequent breeding success.

Cookie Policy

Our website uses cookies to provide you with a better online experience. If you continue to use our site without changing your browser settings, we'll assume you are happy to receive cookies. Please read our cookie policy for more information.

Do not show this message again