How do different releasing techniques affect the survival of reintroduced grey partridges Perdix perdix?

Author Buner, F.D., & Schaub, M.
Citation Buner, F.D., & Schaub, M. (2008). How do different releasing techniques affect the survival of reintroduced grey partridges Perdix perdix?. Wildlife Biology, 14: 26-35.

Abstract

The quality of released individuals can have a significant impact on the success of reintroduction projects. We tested which of the following release techniques resulted in the highest survival of released grey partridges Perdix perdix in Switzerland: 1) translocation of wild adult birds, 2) release of captive parent-reared adults as family groups, and 3) fostering of captive parent-reared chicks to wild barren pairs. Wild hatched offspring (F1 birds) from our re-established breeding pairs served as the control group. We used a multi-state capture-recapture model to estimate monthly survival rates from the data based on monitoring of radio-tagged individuals and reobservation and recovery of ringed individuals. Survival tended to be highest in wild-hatched partridges of the founder population (mean ± SE; 0.90 ± 0.03), followed by that of fostered chicks (0.86 ± 0.03) and translocated adult wild birds (0.82 ± 0.06). While survival of these groups was not statistically different from each other, survival of captive-reared adults was significantly lower (0.70 ± 0.06).We discuss the implication of our results for further partridge reintroduction projects.

Cookie Policy

Our website uses cookies to provide you with a better online experience. If you continue to use our site without changing your browser settings, we'll assume you are happy to receive cookies. Please read our cookie policy for more information.

Do not show this message again